Wednesday, 29 June 2016

The Glory of Westminster Abbey


THIS ARTICLE WAS FIRST PUBLISHED IN JANUARY, 2010. I RE-ISSUED IT TO MARK THE OCCASION OF THE MARRIAGE OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS PRINCE WILLIAM OF WALES KG TO MISS CATHERINE MIDDLETON ON FRIDAY, 29TH APRIL, 2011. MY LATEST VISIT WAS IN JUNE, 2016.


It is over one thousand years old; the royal church of coronations, dedicated on December 28th, 1065; the first recorded coronation being one year later, in 1066.

This glorious kingly place of worship, the very embodiment of English and British history, final resting place of so many Sovereigns, where the shrine of St Edward the Confessor lies, is Westminster Abbey.

I do feel "carried away" here; I feel the history coming from the stones and walls of this place.

I feel at home here. This Abbey and Collegiate Church is a National monument; a precious treasure; even a ancient museum of tombs and monuments.

It is, to me, probably the most sacred, significant building in Christendom.

I arrived at ten twenty-seven; and left over three hours later, at one fifty-five, when I walked over to St Margaret's, parish church of Westminster and somewhat dwarfed by the great Abbey beside it.

St Margaret's itself is medieval; a "youngster" compared to the Abbey. 

In the Abbey, I marvelled at the innumerable monuments and tombs of our Kings and Queens; statesmen; poets; admirals and generals.

The Royal Air Force has a tiny chapel at the east end, within the Lady Chapel (above).

Also in the Lady Chapel are the stalls and banners of the Knights Grand Cross - military and civil - of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath.

Here we have the Arms of our most senior admirals, generals and air chief marshals; and the most senior civil servants in the Kingdom.

While I passed close to the shrine of St Edward, I was approached by a truly lovely lady who, it transpired, was a member of clergy on duty in the Abbey that day. 

We chatted at length about the Abbey and also about her own church, St Bartholomew-the-Less in the City.

She said she'd noticed me spending time in wandering round the Abbey; and would have invited me to join her for prayers at the shrine of St Edward, which I'd have been honoured to do.

To my mind, Westminster Abbey is one of the the most important buildings in England.

A visit - or pilgrimage - to this glorious abbey church is essential.

The Hamilton Baronetcy (1781)

THE HAMILTON BARONETCY, OF DUNAMANAGH, COUNTY TYRONE, WAS CREATED IN 1781 FOR JOHN STUART HAMILTON, POLITICIAN

JOHN HAMILTON, of Dullerton, County Tyrone, and jure uxoris of Manor Elieston, married Sarah, daughter of Sir William Hamilton, of Manor Elieston, son of Sir Claud Hamilton, brother of James, 1st Earl of Abercorn, and son of Claud, 1st Lord Paisley.

Mr Hamilton's son,

JOHN HAMILTON, of Dunamanagh (Donemana), County Tyrone, had, with another daughter, wife of John Hamilton, of Hamilton's Grove, County Antrim, at least other three daughters and a son, viz.

WILLIAM HAMILTON, of Dunamanagh, County Tyrone, MP for Strabane, married, in 1735, Catherine, daughter of the Rev George Leslie DD, of Ballyconnell House, County Cavan. His son,

(SIR) JOHN STUART HAMILTON (c1740-1802), MP for Strabane, 1763-76; married the Hon Sarah Hamilton, daughter of Frederick, 3rd Viscount Boyne.

Mr Hamilton was created a baronet in 1781.
Sir John was a member of the Dublin Society, 1769-76. His membership lapsed in 1777 but was renewed more than twenty years later in 1798. He was listed by the Society as a member in 1802-03, and deleted ca 1804.
It is thought that the following statement alludes to the 1st Baronet, Sir John Stuart Hamilton:
"When he was but nineteen he was unanimously elected one of the representatives in Parliament for Strabane, in which high and honourable station he behaved for upwards of thirty years with a conduct suitable to the great confidence reposed in him:

To his immortal honour he was one of those heroic patriots of Fabrician fortitude, who signalized themselves in so conspicuous a manner in the successful defence of the pass, which in 1753 was strenuously attempted to be forced, in order to overthrow the parliamentary constitution of this country; for which they were distinguished from their opponents by their wearing gold medals in memory of that glorious epoch:

And so sensible were his constituents of his singular merit and invariable principles in favour of his country, that at the late general election they unanimously re-elected him
"to represent them in parliament; the goodness and benevolence of his heart endeared him to all, and render his death universally lamented. He is succeeded in his estate by John Hamilton, Esq., his eldest son and heir."
SIR JOHN CHARLES HAMILTON, 2nd Baronet, died in 1818, when the baronetcy expired. 

First published in January, 2011

Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Lismore House

THE NESBITT FAMILY WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY CAVAN, WITH 9,735 ACRES

ANDREW NESBITT, of Brenter (presumed to be son of Thomas Nesbitt, of Newbottle, and grandson of George Nesbitt, who died in 1590), assignee from the Earl of Annandale, of the estates of Brenter and Malmusock, County Donegal, was father of 

ANDREW NESBITT, who served in the army of CHARLES I in Ireland; whose eldest son,

THOMAS NESBITT, of Grangemore, County Westmeath, High Sheriff in 1720, and MP for Cavan, 1715-50, married twice.

His heir, 

COSBY NESBITT, of Lismore, born in 1718, MP for Cavan, 1750-67, High Sheriff, 1764, succeeded to the Cavan estates on the death of his father.

His eldest son, 

THOMAS NESBITT, of Lismore, a colonel in the army, MP for Cavan, 1768-99, High Sheriff 1769, married and was succeeded by his eldest son, 

COSBY NESBITT JP DL, High Sheriff, 1798, major in the Cavan Militia; whose second son, 

ALEXANDER NESBITT DL, of Lismore House, County Cavan, and Old Lands, Sussex, born in 1817, was High Sheriff of Cavan, 1862.

This gentleman died without issue and succeeded by his sister, 

MARY ANNE BURROWES, whose son 

THOMAS COSBY BURROWES JP DL, of Lismore, County Cavan, born in 1856, was High Sheriff, 1888, succeeded his uncle in 1886.

Mr Burrowes married, in 1885, the Hon Anna Frances Maxwell, sister of 10th Baron Farnham, and had issue,
Eleanor Mary (1886-1962);
Rosamund Charlotte, born 1891.
Rosamund Charlotte Cosby Burrowes married Major Shuckburgh Upton Lucas-Clements in 1922.

She was with Voluntary Aid Detachment during the 1st World War, where she was mentioned in dispatches.

She lived in 1976 at Lismore, and had issue,
Elizabeth Anne, b 1922;
Thomas, b 1925;
John, b 1930;
Robert Henry, b 1930.

LISMORE HOUSE, near Crossdoney, County Cavan, was built ca 1730.

The main block was of two storeys over a high basement, with a pediment breakfront centre and a widely spaced Venetian window in both storeys.

There were two bays either side of the centre, overlapping tower wings of one storey each.

The house had a solid roof parapet with urns and oculi in the upper storey of the office wings.

Lismore passed to the Lucas-Clements family through the marriage of Miss R Burrowes to Major Shuckburgh Lucas-Clements in 1922.

Having stood empty for many years, the house fell into ruin and was finally demolished ca 1952, with the exception of a tower wing.

The estate is three miles from the Farnham estate and hotel.


The office wings were used as farm buildings and appear to have been converted to modern living accomodation. The family moved to the former agent's house.

First published in May, 2012.

Monday, 27 June 2016

Burton Hall

THE  BURTON FAMILY WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY CARLOW, WITH 5,964 ACRES

SIR EDWARD BURTON, Knight, of Longner, representative of the family, was with EDWARD IV, successful in fourteen set battles between the Houses of York and Lancaster; and for his great loyalty and services, he was made knight-bannaret, under the royal standard in the field, in 1460.

He was succeeded by his son,

SIR ROBERT BURTON, Knight, of Longner, who was knighted by EDWARD IV, in 1478.

This gentleman received a grant of arms from John Writhe, Norroy King of Arms, in the same year, and was father of

SIR EDWARD BURTON, Knight, of Longner, Master of the Robes to HENRY VII. who wedded Jocosa, daughter of Thomas Cressett, of Upton Cressett, Shropshire.

He died in 1524, leaving, with a younger son, Thomas, an elder son, his successor,

JOHN BURTON, of Longner, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Poyner, of Boston, Shrophire, and had issue,
EDWARD, his successor;
Jane; Eleanor; Ankekoka; Ann; Ankred; Mary.
Sir Edward died in 1543, and was succeeded by his only son,

EDWARD BURTON, of Longner, who wedded Ann, daughter and heir of Nicholas Madocks, of Wem and Coton, Shrophire, and had issue,
THOMAS, his heir (ancestor of BURTON of Longner);
EDWARD, of whom we treat;
Humphrey;
Timothy;
Mary; Dorothy; Katherine.
Mr Burton's second son,

EDWARD BURTON, had issue, two sons, who both settled in Ireland in 1610,
Francis, dsp;
THOMAS, of whom hereafter.
The younger son,

THOMAS BURTON, of Buncraggy, County Clare, whose will was proved in 1666, married Ann, daughter of _____ Shepherd, of Baycote, Herefordshire, and had issue (with two daughters), an only son,

SAMUEL BURTON, of Buncraggy, who married Margery Harris, and died in 1712, leaving issue,
Francis, of Buncraggy, MP;
Charles;
BENJAMIN, of whom hereafter;
Dorothea.
The third son,

BENJAMIN BURTON, becoming an eminent banker in Dublin, was Lord Mayor of that city, 1706, and represented it in parliament, 1703-23.

He espoused, in 1686, Grace, elder daughter of Robert Stratford, of Belan, County Kildare, and by her had six sons, with as many daughters,
SAMUEL;
Robert;
Benjamin;
Edward;
Charles (Sir), MP for Dublin; cr a
BARONET;
Francis;
Mary; Grace; Elizabeth; Lettice; Abigail; Jane.
The eldest son of Benjamin Burton, of Dublin,

SAMUEL BURTON, of Burton Hall, MP for Sligo, 1713, and for Dublin, 1727, High Sheriff of County Carlow, 1724, espoused firstly, in 1708, Anne, daughter of Charles Campbell, of Dublin, and by her (who was killed by the fall of a scaffold at the coronation of GEORGE I in 1714) had issue,
BENJAMIN, his heir;
Hughes;
Samuel;
Katherine; Mary.
He was succeeded by his eldest son,

THE RT HON BENJAMIN BURTON MP, of Burton Hall, a distinguished politician and statesman, who wedded, in 1734, the Lady Anne Ponsonby, daughter of Brabazon, 1st Earl of Bessborough, and had issue, four sons and two daughters,
Benjamin, High Sheriff, 1760; MP for Sligo, 1757; d unm, 1763;
WILLIAM, succeeded to the estates;
Campbell;
Ponsonby;
Sarah; Anna. 
His second but eldest surviving son, 

WILLIAM HENRY BURTON MP (1739-1818), of Burton Hall, married, in 1765, Mary, only child of Henry Aston, County Wicklow, and had issue,
BENJAMIN, of whom presently;
William Henry;
Martha.
Mr Burton's eldest son, 

BENJAMIN BURTON, of Walcot House, Stamford, Lincolnshire, born in 1766, married and had issue,

WILLIAM FITZWILLIAM BURTON JP (1796-1844), of Burton Hall; High Sheriff of Carlow, 1822, who wedded twice and had a numerous family. His eldest son, 

WILLIAM FITZWILLIAM BURTON JP (1826-1909), of Burton Hall; High Sheriff, 1849; formerly of the 4th Light Dragoons; married twice and was succeeded by his eldest son,

WILLIAM FITZWILLIAM BURTON (1849-1927), of Burton Hall, County Carlow, and of Goltho Hall, Wragby, Lincolnshire.

Mr Burton married, in 1877, Georgiana Spencer, fourth daughter of Captain the Hon William Henry George Wellesley RN, and granddaughter of Henry, 1st Lord Cowley.

Mr Burton was High Sheriff of County Carlow, 1910.

He sold Gotho Hall in 1918. His children assumed the additional name of Mainwaring.

He was succeeded by his eldest son, 

MAJOR WILLIAM MAINWARING-BURTON (1881-1964), of Marsham Lodge, Gerrard's Cross, Buckinghamshire, who married and had issue,

BURTON HALL, near Carlow, County Carlow, a house of considerable significance, was begun in 1712.

It contained three storeys on a lofty plinth and nine bays, with a three-bay breakfront centre.

The doorway was rusticated, with many steps; bold quoins; a solid roof parapet.

A bow window was added to the garden front ca 1840, and the top storey was removed.

Burton Hall was sold by William Fitzwilliam Burton in 1927 (who died in the same year) and demolished five years later.

All that remains of Burton Hall's former existence is a three-bay, single-storey (over basement) granite building, originally a wing of the house, with carved stone dressings.

First published in May, 2012.

Sunday, 26 June 2016

The Blackwood Baronets (1763)

THE BLACKWOOD BARONETCY, OF BALLYLEIDY, COUNTY DOWN, WAS CREATED IN 1763 FOR ROBERT BLACKWOOD

This family is of Scottish origin.

JOHN BLACKWOOD,
a gentleman of respectable lineage in Fife, removed to Ulster some time towards the middle of the 17th century, and, having acquired considerable property, settled in County Down.
Of the Scottish family of BLACKWOOD, the celebrated Adam Blackwood (1539-1613), privy counsellor to MARYQueen of Scots; and the said JOHN BLACKWOOD, of the same house, had his estate in County Down sequestered, in 1687, by King JAMES II's parliament, but was restored on the accession of WILLIAM III.
Faithfully and zealously attached to his unhappy mistress, this eminent person published, in 1587, his Martyrdom of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scotland.
John Blackwood was interred at Bangor Abbey and his grave-stone reads:
HERE LIES [JOHN] BLACKWOOD, MERCHANT, LATE PROVOST OF BANGOR, WHO DEPARTED THIS LYFE THE 22 OF MAY 1663 AND OF AGE 72. HERE LYES A MAN WHO LIV'D OF LATE INTO A FLOORISHING ESTATE YET WAS IT HIS GLORY THAT THERBY HIMSELF HE DID NOT MAGNIFY A SOBER IVST [Just] AND ..... MAN AND THOVGH HIS LIFE WAS BVT A SPAN YET IT SO BLAMELESS WAS THAT HE DESERVES A LASTING MEMORIE.
From this gentleman descended 

ROBERT BLACKWOOD (1694-1774), in the same county, who was created a baronet in 1763.

Sir Robert married firstly, in 1721,  Joyce, sister of Joseph, 1st Earl of Milltown, and had issue,

SIR JOHN BLACKWOOD,
 2nd Baronet (1721-99), who married, in 1751, Dorcas, eldest daughter and heiress of James Stevenson, of Killyleagh.

He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son,

SIR JAMES STEVENSON BLACKWOOD, 3rd Baronet (1755–1836), who inherited the peerage at the decease of his mother and succeeded as Baron Dufferin and Claneboye in 1807.

Sir Robert married firstly, in 1721, Joyce Leeson, sister of Joseph, 1st Earl of Milltown, and had,
JOHN, his heir;
Leeson, died unmarried, 1773;
Margaret, m to Stewart Banks.
He espoused secondly, Grace, only daughter of Isaac Macartney, by whom he had,
William;
Grace; 
Dorcas; Sarah; Elizabeth.
Sir Robert was succeeded at his decease by his eldest son,  

SIR JOHN BLACKWOOD MP (1721-99), 2nd Baronet, who wedded, in 1751, Dorcas, eldest daughter and heiress of James Stevenson, of Killyleagh, by whom he had issue,
ROBERT, died unmarried 1786;
JAMES, 2nd Baron Dufferin and Claneboye;
John, in holy orders;
HANS, 3rd Baron Dufferin and Claneboye;
Price;
Leeson;
Henry, created a baronet;
Anne; Sophia; Dorcas; Catherine.
Sir John died was succeeded by his second, but eldest surviving son,

SIR JAMES STEVENSON BLACKWOOD, 3rd Baronet (1755–1836), who inherited the peerage at the decease of his mother DORCAS, created Baroness Dufferin and Claneboye in 1800, with remainder to her ladyship's male issue by her deceased husband, Sir John Blackwood.

Sir James was MP for Killyleagh from 1788 till the Irish Parliament was abolished in 1801.

He was later MP for the Cornish constituency of Helston, 1807-12; and for Aldeburgh, Suffolk, 1812-18.

He then sat in the House of Lords as a Representative peer for Ireland, 1820-36.

Through his mother, Dorcas, Lady Dufferin, Sir James became the senior representative and heir general of James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Clanbrassil.

He succeeded her in 1808 as the Baron Dufferin and Claneboye.

Sir James was married on 15 November, 1801, to Anne Dorothea, only daughter of 1st Baron Oriel.

He died in 1836, and was succeeded by his brother Hans.

Lady Blackwood died in 1865, aged 93. They had no children. 

Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Baron Dufferin and Claneboye and 6th Baronet (1826–1902) was created Earl of Dufferin in 1871 and further advanced to a marquessate, as Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, in 1888.

John Francis Blackwood, 11th Baron Dufferin and Claneboye (b 1944), is the 12th Blackwood Baronet of Ballyleidy, and the 8th Blackwood Baronet of the Navy.

The Blackwood Baronets' town residence was at 13 Cavendish Square, London.

First published in June, 2012.

Saturday, 25 June 2016

Glenart Castle

THE EARLS OF CARYSFORT WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY WICKLOW, WITH 16,674 ACRES

The family of PROBY, of antiquity and distinction, came originally from Wales, and were there named Ap-Probyn; though they flourished for many ages in Huntingdonshire.

RANDOLPH PROBY, of the city of Chester, settled at Brampton, Huntingdonshire, at the close of the 15th century, and by his wife, Alice Bernard, had two sons,
RALPH, of Brampton, dsp;
PETER, of whom we treat.
His surviving son,

SIR PETER PROBY, of Brampton, Huntingdonshire, and Swithin's Lane, London, served the office of Lord Mayor of London in 1622, and dying three years afterwards, left several children, of whom the eldest,

SIR HENEAGE PROBY (1600-67), Knight, of Elton, married Helen, daughter of Edward Allen, of Finchley, and had two sons.

Sir Heneage served the office of Sheriff of Buckinghamshire, and was MP for Agmondesham.

He was succeeded by his elder son,

SIR THOMAS PROBY (1632-89), who was created a baronet in 1662.

He married Frances, daughter of Sir Thomas Cotton Bt, of Connington, Huntingdonshire, and left an only surviving daughter, Alice, who wedded Thomas Wentworth, and was mother of Thomas, Marquess of Rockingham.

Sir Thomas dying thus without male issue, the baronetcy expired, but the estates devolved upon his brother,

JOHN PROBY, at whose decease, in 1710, those estates passed to the next male heir,

WILLIAM PROBY (elder son of Charles, third son of Sir Peter Proby), governor of Fort St George, Madras, who married Henrietta, daughter of Robert Cornwall, of Borrington, Herefordshire, by whom he had a daughter, Editha, the wife of Sir John Osborne Bt, of Newtown, County Tipperary, and an only son,

JOHN PROBY, of Elton Hall,  MP for Huntingdonshire, who espoused Jane, eldest daughter of John, 1st Baron Gower, and had by her,
JOHN, his successor;
William;
Thomas, killed at the attack of Fort Ticonderoga, 1756;
Charles, captain RN;
Baptist (Very Rev), Dean of Lichfield;
Caroline.
Mr Proby was succeeded by his eldest son, 

THE RT HON SIR JOHN PROBY KB (1720-72), MP for Huntingdonshire, and one of the Lords of the Admiralty in 1757, who was elevated to the Irish peerage as Baron Carysfort in 1752.

His lordship wedded, in 1750, Elizabeth, daughter of John, 2nd Viscount Allen, and co-heir of her brother John, 3rd Viscount, by whom he had issue,

JOHN JOSHUA, 2nd Baron, KP, who was created EARL OF CARYSFORT, in 1789.

This nobleman was appointed a Knight of the Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick in 1784

He espoused, in 1774, Elizabeth, only daughter of the Rt Hon Sir William Osborne Bt, of Newtown, County Tipperary, by whom he had issue,
WILLIAM ALLEN, Lord Proby (1779-1804); Captain, RN;
JOHN, 2nd Earl;
Granville Leveson;
Gertrude.
The 1st Earl espoused secondly, in 1787, Elizabeth, daughter of the Rt Hon George Grenville, and sister of George, 1st Marquess of Buckingham, and left by that lady at his decease, in 1828, three other daughters, namely,
Charlotte;
Frances;
Elizabeth.
The Probys were a Patrick family, viz. three Earls were appointed to the Order of St Patrick.

In 1860, Lord Carysfort married Charlotte, daughter of Rev Robert Booshy, but the marriage was childless, and the titles expired on the death of the 5th Earl.


GLENART CASTLE, near Arklow, County Wicklow, was originally a hunting lodge of ca 1750, enlarged in the castellated style during the early 1800s by John Proby, 1st Earl of Carysfort.

It was known for a while as Kilcarra Castle.

Between 1177 and 1185, large quantities of land were granted by Prince John acting on behalf of his father, HENRY II, to Theobald Walter from whom were descended the Butler Family and the Earls of Ormonde.

The Butlers held their possession in this area for the next 500 years.

Glenart was enlarged again in 1869.


It is a fairly austere structure, mainly two-storey, though partly of three storeys dominated by a square, battlemented tower.

There are large rectangular windows with hood mouldings, three-sided bows and a battlemented parapet.


The Castle was partially burnt in 1920, though the remaining half continued to be inhabited by the family as an occasional residence till it was sold during the 2nd World War to a religious order, which rebuilt it in an institutional style. 

Other seat ~ Elton Hall, Peterborough.
Former town house ~ 11 Lower Berkeley Street, London.

Carysfort arms courtesy of European Heraldry.   First published in May, 2012.

Friday, 24 June 2016

House of Stewart


This branch of the noble house of STEWART claims a common ancestor with the Earls of Galloway; namely, Sir William Stewart, of Garlies, from whose second son, Sir Thomas Stewart, of Minto.

WILLIAM STEWART, of Ballylawn Castle, County Donegal (great-grandson of John Stewart, who had a grant from CHARLES I of Stewart's Court Manor, where he erected Ballylawn Castle), took an active part in Ulster affairs in order to prevent the subversion of the constitution, which King JAMES II and his chief governor, the Earl of Tyrconnell, were attempting to effect.

He raised a troop of horse at his own expense when the city of Londonderry was occupied, and actively promoted the Protestant interest there by protecting those who were favourably disposed to WILLIAM III.

Mr Stewart was appointed lieutenant-colonel in the regiment commanded by Sir William Stewart, Viscount Mountjoy.

He married the daughter of William Stewart, of Fort Stewart, County Donegal (grandson of the Rt Hon Sir William Stewart Bt, whose descendant was created Baron Stewart of Ramelton and Viscount Mountjoy), and died leaving issue, a daughter,

MARTHA, who wedded John Kennedy, of Cultra, County Down; and two sons, of whom

THOMAS KENNEDY, the eldest, succeeded at Ballylawn Castle, and served as a captain in Lord Mountjoy's regiment.

He espoused Mary, second daughter of Bernard Ward (ancestor of the Viscounts Bangor), by Mary, sister of the Rt Rev Michael Ward, Lord Bishop of Derry; and dying without issue, 1740, was succeeded by his only brother,

ALEXANDER STEWART (1699-1781), who represented the city of Londonderry in parliament, and purchased the estate of MOUNT STEWART, County Down, from the Colville family.

He married, in 1737, his cousin Mary, only daughter of Alderman John Cowan, of Londonderry (by Anne Stewart, second daughter of Alexander Stewart, of Ballylawn Castle, and sister and sole heir of Sir Robert Cowan, Governor of Bombay, and had issue,
ROBERT, his heir;
William, died in infancy;
John, 1744-62;
Alexander;
Anne; Frances; Mary.
The eldest son,

ROBERT STEWART (1739-1821), of Ballylawn Castle, County Donegal, and of Mount Stewart, County Down, who, having represented the latter county in parliament, and having been sworn a member of the Privy Council, was elected to the Irish peerage, in 1789, as Baron Stewart.

His lordship was advanced to the dignity of Viscount Castlereagh in 1795, and Earl of Londonderry in 1796.

This nobleman was further advanced to the dignity of a marquessate, as MARQUESS OF LONDONDERRY, in 1816.

His lordship wedded firstly, in 1766, the Lady Sarah Frances Seymour-Conway, second daughter of Francis, 1st Marquess of Hertford, and had issue,
Alexander Francis, 1767-9;
ROBERT, his successor.
He wedded secondly, in 1775, the Lady Frances Pratt, eldest daughter of Charles, 1st Earl Camden, and had issue,
CHARLES WILLIAM, 3rd Marquess;
Alexander John, 1783-1800;
Thomas Henry, 1790-1810;
Frances Anne; Elizabeth Mary; Caroline; Georgiana;
Selina Sarah Juliana; Matilda Charlotte; Emily Jane; Catharine Octavia.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

ROBERT, 2nd Marquess (1769-1822), KG, GCH, PC.
The heir presumptive is his brother Lord Reginald Alexander Vane-Tempest-Stewart (b. 1977).
The heir presumptive's heir is his son Robin Gabriel Vane-Tempest-Stewart (b 2004).
Former seats ~ Mount Stewart, County Down; Wynyard Park, County Durham; Seaham Hall, near Stockton-on-Tees.

Former town residence ~ Londonderry House, Park Lane, London.

First published in March, 2012.