Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Cullintraw Day

I've spent a wonderful day in the lovely County Down countryside, at a field near Castle Espie known locally as Cullintraw.

This field is beside an estuary, in the Ulster townland of Cattogs.

There were about fourteen National Trust volunteers and staff today.

Our task was to clear the field of rushes which we had cut a month ago.


These rushes had been made into stacks, so our tractor and trailer took most of them away.

I lunched on banana sandwiches and coffee; and some of us brought some treats, viz. buns and crunchy biscuits.

Barretstown Castle

THE BORROWES BARONETS WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY KILDARE, WITH 6,089 ACRES


This family is a scion of the ancient house of DE BURGH, for centuries so eminent under the names of Burgh, Bourke, Burke, and Borough. 

HENRY BORROWES, who settled in Ireland in the reign of ELIZABETH I, married firstly, Jane, daughter of the Rt Hon Sir Arthur Savage MP, of Rheban, County Kildare.

He wedded secondly, in 1585, Catherine Eustace, of Gilltown.

Mr Borrowes was succeeded by his son, 

ERASMUS BORROWES, of Gilltown, MP.
This gentleman, who was high sheriff of County Kildare, at the breaking out of the rebellion in 1641, deposed, upon oath, that he was unable to resist the Irish by the Posse Comitatus; and that he had lost in goods, corn, and cattle, at his several houses of Grangemellan, Gilltown, and Carbally, £9,396; in debts, £11,932; besides a yearly income of £1,200, or thereabouts; in consideration whereof, and of his goods and rightful services, CHARLES I, in 1646, created him a baronet.
Sir Erasmus married Sarah, daughter of Walter Weldon MP, of Woodstock Castle, and granddaughter maternally of the Rt Rev John Ryder, Lord Bishop of Killaloe.

Sir Erasmus had, with a daughter, two sons, by the survivor of whom he was succeeded, viz.

SIR WALTER BORROWES, 2nd Baronet (c1620-85),
who married firstly, in 1656 (the ceremony being performed with great pomp, before the Rt Hon Ridgeway Hatfield, Lord Mayor of Dublin) Lady Eleanor FitzGerald, 3rd daughter of George, 16th Earl of Kildare.
He married secondly, Margaret, fifth daughter of the Rt Hon Sir Adam Loftus MP, of Rathfarnham.

By the former he had, with a daughter, an only son, his successor,

SIR KILDARE BORROWES, 3rd Baronet, MP (c1660-1709), who married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Richard Dixon, and sister of Robert Dixon, by whom he had two sons and three daughters.

Sir Kildare, who represented County Kildare in parliament for nine years, was succeeded by his elder son,

SIR WALTER DIXON BORROWES, 4th Baronet (1691-1741), MP for the borough of Athy, who inherited the estates of his maternal uncle, Robert Dixon, already mentioned, in 1725.

He married, in 1720,  Mary, daughter and co-heir of Captain Edward Pottinger, by whom he had three sons; the second and third died unmarried; and the eldest succeeded to the baronetcy, and became, 

SIR KILDARE DIXON BORROWES, 5th Baronet (1722-90).

This gentleman was high sheriff of Kildare in 1751, for which county he had been some years before (1745) returned to parliament.

He married firstly, in 1759, Elizabeth, only daughter and heiress of John Short, of Grange, Queen's County, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

He wedded secondly, in 1769,  Jane, daughter of Joseph Higginson, of Mount Ophaley, County Kildare, by whom he had four sons and two daughters.

Sir Kildare was succeeded by his eldest son, 

SIR ERASMUS DIXON BORROWES, 6th Baronet (1759-1814), who married, in 1783, Harriet, youngest daughter of the Very Rev Arthur Champagné, Dean of Clonmacnoise, and great-granddaughter (maternally) of Arthur, 2nd Earl of Granard; by whom he had issue,
WALTER DIXON;
Arthur;
Kildare;
ERASMUS;
Marianne; Harriet; Elizabeth.
Sir Erasmus was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR WALTER DIXON BORROWES, 7th Baronet (1789-1834), who, dying a bachelor, was succeeded by his only surviving brother, 

THE REV SIR ERASMUS DIXON BORROWES, 8th Baronet (1799-1866), rector of Ballyroan, Queen's County, who married, in 1825, Harriet, daughter of Henry Hamilton, and niece of Hans Hamilton MP, and had issue,
Kildare (1828-37);
ERASMUS;
Walter Joseph;
Henrietta Mary;
Adelaide Charlotte Marianne;
Eleanor Caroline.
He was succeeded by his elder surviving son, 

SIR ERASMUS DIXON BORROWES, 9th Baronet (1831-98), born at Dublin, who married firstly, in 1851, Frederica Eaten, daughter of Brig-Gen. George Hutcheson; and secondly, in 1887, Florence Elizabeth, daughter of William Ruxton and Caroline Diana Vernon.
Sir Erasmus was educated at Cheltenham College, Gloucestershire; was Ensign in 1852 in the 80th Foot; fought in the Second Burma War in 1853; fought in the Indian Mutiny, where he was wounded; promoted Captain in 1859; Major in 1867 in the 13th Foot; Sheriff of County Kildare, 1873; Sheriff of Queen's County, 1880.
He lived at Barretstown Castle, County Kildare.

SIR KILDARE BORROWES, 10th Baronet (1852-1924), married, in 1886, Julia, daughter of William Holden.
Sir Kildare was educated at Cheltenham College, Gloucestershire; a captain in the 11th Hussars; aide-de-camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He retired from the army with the rank of lieutenant-colonel.
The baronetcy became extinct on the death of Sir Eustace Dixon Borrowes, 11th baronet, in 1939.


BARRETSTOWN CASTLE, Ballymore Eustace, Naas, County Kildare, is an old tower-house with a two-storey, Gothic-Victorian addition.

The latter has rectangular, pointed and segmental-pointed plate glass windows.

One side of the front has a four-storey tower with a stepped gable.


The first historical mention of the place is in a 1547 inquisition held after the dissolution of the monasteries, when Barretstown Castle was listed as the property of the Lord Archbishop of Dublin, from whom it was promptly confiscated by the Crown.

Thereafter the Castle was held by the Eustace family on a series of "permanent leases."

In the 17th century, Sir Walter Borrowes married a daughter of the Earl of Kildare and acquired the estate, and the family retained possession for over two centuries.

Members of the family, such as Sir Kildare Borrowes, 5th Baronet, represented Kildare County and Harristown in the former Irish Parliament.

Unlike the Eustace Baronets of the 16th and 17th centuries, the five Borrowes Baronets, who spanned the 19th century, played no part in public life.

Sir Kildare, 10th Baronet (1852–1924), whose father, the Rev Sir Erasmus, 8th Baronet, had significantly modified the residence in a medieval, romantic, asymmetrical style, was the last of the family to live at Barretstown.

In 1918, the Borrowes family left Ireland and Barretstown was purchased by Sir George Sheppard Murray, a Scotsman who converted the estate into a fine stud farm, and planted many of the exotic trees that dominate the landscape.

In 1962, Elizabeth Arden acquired the castle from the Murray family. Over five years, Arden extensively reconstructed, redecorated, and refurnished the castle. Her influence dominates the look of the house to this day.

The door of the castle is reputed to have been painted red after her famous brand of perfume Red Door, and remains so to this day.

After Arden's death in 1967, the billionnaire Garfield Weston took up residence.

Under his ownership the grounds were significantly improved, particularly through the addition of a magnificent lake in front of the castle.
The Weston family, which owns Dublin's famous Brown Thomas department store, presented the estate to the Irish government in 1977, during which time it was used for national and international conferences and seminars, as well as being used as a part of the Irish National Stud.
The Irish government has leased the castle and its grounds to the Barretstown Gang Camp Fund for the next 90 years.

First published in September, 2012.

Tuesday, 16 September 2014

The Cole Baronetcy

THE COLE BARONETCY, OF NEWLAND, COUNTY DUBLIN, WAS CREATED IN 1660 FOR JOHN COLE MP

By a deed of WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, extant, it appears that the COLES were of the rank of barons, and were resident in Hampshire in that monarch's reign.

SIR WILLIAM COLE, knight,
the first member of the Cole family who settled in Ireland, fixed his abode, early in the reign of JAMES I, in County Fermanagh, and becoming an undertaker in the plantation of Ulster, had an assignment, in 1611, of 1,000 acres of escheated lands in the county wherein he resided; to which, in 1612, were added 320 acres in the same county, whereof 80 acres were assigned for the town of Enniskillen, and that town was then incorporated by charter, consisting of a provost and twelve burgesses, Sir William Cole being the first provost (mayor).
Sir William raised a regiment, which he commanded against the rebels, in 1643, with important success.
He married twice: Firstly, to Susannah, daughter and heir of John Croft, of Lancaster, by whom he had two daughters; and secondly, to Catherine, daughter of Sir Laurence Parsons, of Birr, second Baron of the Irish Exchequer, by whom he left, at his decease, in 1653, two sons, namely,
Michael, his successor, ancestor of the Earls of Enniskillen;
JOHN, of whom we treat.
The younger son, 

SIR JOHN COLE, of Newland, County Dublin,
MP for Fermanagh, having distinguished himself during the rebellion, particularly in the relief of Enniskillen, of which he was governor, and being instrumental in promoting the restoration of CHARLES II, was created a baronet in 1660.
He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Chichester, of Dungannon, and was succeeded, following his decease, in 1691, by his eldest son,

SIR ARTHUR COLE, 2nd Baronet (c1664-1754), MP, who was created, by GEORGE I, in 1715, BARON RANELAGH, with limitation of the title, in default of his male issue, to the heirs male of his father.

Dying without male issue, in 1754, aged 90, the titles became extinct.

***** 

HAVING first served in the Low Countries, Cole came to Ireland to try his fortune in 1601, and served under Sir George Carew, 1st Earl of Totnes and Lord President of Munster.

In 1607 he was appointed Captain of the Longboats and Barges at Ballyshannon and Lough Erne.

His future was, however, uncertain until the Flight of the Earls and, particularly, that of Cuchonnacht Maguire of Enniskillen.

In 1609, Cole was made Constable or Governor of Enniskillen.

He was knighted in 1617 and became one of the principal promoters and implementers of the Plantation in County Fermanagh, receiving extensive grants of land in and around Enniskillen in 1610-12 and acquiring more by purchase.

When Enniskillen was incorporated as a parliamentary borough in 1613, Cole became its first Provost.

At this stage, Enniskillen was seen as very much the county town of Fermanagh, and its original corporation included influential settlers (mostly English) like Cole.

But in the period 1611-23, Cole obtained leases or grants, on increasingly advantageous terms, of the two-thirds of the island of Enniskillen which went with the castle and the one-third which was intended as an endowment of the town.

The building of the town was largely a Cole initiative (there were only an estimated 180 inhabitants ca 1630).

Soon, Enniskillen became what a parliamentary reformer of 1790 called
the private property of the Earl of Enniskillen, and the [provost and] twelve burgesses, its sole electors, . .. the confidential trustees of his appointment.
 According to Pynnar's highly critical survey in 1619 of the practical operation of the Plantation, Cole was not wholly rigorous in the observance of the terms of his grants, particularly in the matter of administering the oath of supremacy to his tenants; but he was praised in 1622 for enforcing on his tenants at Portora the prohibition against sub-letting to the Irish.

Re-grants were made to him at subsequent dates re-emphasising some of his obligations, permitting some leasing to the Irish, and doubling the rents payable by him to the crown.

In general, he seems to have been more scrupulous than most Plantation patentees. Later, he was described by a contemporary as 'a brave, forward and prudent gentleman'.

He was elected MP for Fermanagh in 1634 and again in 1639. In 1641 he had a narrow escape from a treacherous death on the outbreak of the rising.

He raised a regiment and fought at its head (in spite of advancing years) in the confused wars of the 1640s, espousing the Parliamentarian cause and successfully defending Enniskillen against the Maguires. He died in 1653.

He had two sons, Michael and John, the elder of whom predeceased him.

John, the younger son, who died ca 1691, was made Custos Rotulorum for County Fermanagh and a baronet in 1661, being then, in effect, the head of the Cole family, because Sir Michael Cole, Kt, son of Sir John's elder brother, Michael, did not come of age until probably about 1663.

Sir John Cole, 1st Baronet, was a figure of more than local significance, as he was one of the commissioners appointed to implement the acts of Settlement and Explanation (the Restoration land settlement in Ireland).

He lived at Newland [probably Newlands, Clondalkin], County Dublin.

Sir John had a number of sons and daughters, many of whom died young.

In 1671, one of these daughters, Elizabeth, married as his second wife, her cousin, Sir Michael Cole.

On the occasion of this marriage, Sir John Cole settled on his daughter's issue his estate at Montagh, barony of Clanawley, County Fermanagh (which he had purchased in 1658).

This estate 'marched' or was intermingled with Sir Michael's own patrimonial estate in the barony of Clanawley.

Montagh did not, as the 4th Earl of Belmore erroneously supposed, include the site of the future Florence Court; but its accession shifted the centre of gravity of Sir Michael Cole's estate southward of Enniskillen, and must have had a great bearing on the decision to build in that location.

Montagh never actually belonged to Sir Michael, but came into the possession of the eldest son of the marriage, John Cole, either at his coming of age in 1711 or at his mother's death in 1733.

Nevertheless, it continued to be recorded as a separate entity in the family rentals until well into the 19th century.

In 1754, at the death of Sir Arthur Cole, 2nd Baronet and 1st Baron Ranelagh, only surviving son of Sir John Cole, 1st Baronet, his great-nephew, John Cole, the future Lord Mount Florence, had an income of £2,220 a year, which doubled his rental and provided him with the means to begin building soon afterwards.

The stated extent of the inheritance seems much exaggerated (if John Cole had had an income of £4,400 (equivalent to £733,000 in 2011) in 1754, he would have been among the richest men in Ireland), and it is not clear where the figure comes from.

Probably the source is one of the updated editions of Thomas Prior's List of the Absentees of Ireland, first published in 1729, which gives figures which are usually inflated.

In the present instance, however, the figure is even more misleading because it is based on the assumption that all Lord Ranelagh's estates went to John Cole.

This was not so.

Lord Ranelagh had other great-nephews and nieces, including Sir Arthur Brooke, Bt, of Colebrooke, County Fermanagh, whose ancestor would hardly have called his house Colebrooke if he had not received a significant endowment when he married Lord Ranelagh's sister.

Sir Arthur himself inherited (probably in 1754) Lord Ranelagh's estates in Counties Tipperary and Clare.

The County Dublin and Dublin City property seems to have been divided between Sir Arthur and the aforementioned Henry Moore, another great-nephew (hence the proximity of Cole's Lane, Moore Street, etc, in the vicinity of the General Post Office).

Even the West Dean and East Grimstead estate, Wiltshire (as has already been noted), was not inherited by the Florence Court Coles until 1819, and even then was subject to various co-heir-ships.
Lord Ranelagh was the origin of the Coles' mysterious 12,000 acre estate in County Waterford; but as it does not feature in Cole deeds of settlement until the 1790s, it – like the East Grimstead estate - may have been subject to a life interest to Lady Ranelagh which did not expire until 1781, ten years after Florence Court was completed.
At the very least it would have been subject to its share of her jointure. Old men with younger wives and no other close relations, are likely to make sure that their widows are well provided for.

In other words, Florence Court may have been built on Ranelagh 'tick' (and paid for later out of the proceeds from the sale of the Waterford estate), but there is most unlikely to have been any great influx of cash in 1754.

In fact, the main windfalls of cash at this time came from the sale of the seats for the borough of Enniskillen: one was sold in 1761, and both at the general elections of 1768, 1776 and 1783.

The prices are unrecorded, but must have been between £1,500 and £2,000 per seat.

Lord Ranelagh died in 1754, aged 90, without issue when the baronetcy and barony both became extinct.

MUCH OF MY RESEARCH EMANATES FROM THE ENNISKILLEN PAPERS, WHICH ARE DEPOSITED AT THE PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE OF NORTHERN IRELAND.

First published in April, 2011.  Ranelagh arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Derryquin Castle

THE BLANDS WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY KERRY, WITH 25,576 ACRES

SIR CHRISTOPHER BLAND WAS CHAIRMAN OF THE BBC BOARD OF GOVERNORS, 1996-2001


This family were originally seated in Yorkshire. The first who settled in Ireland was

THE VERY REV JAMES BLAND, vicar of Killarney, 1692, and Dean of Ardfert, 1721.

In a deed of sale registered in Wakefield, in 1717, he is described as "of Killarney, County Kerry", and as disposing of his estates in Sedbergh, Yorkshire, to Richard Willen.

This James was the son of John Bland, of Sedbergh, as proved by the records of St John's College, Cambridge, where he was admitted in 1684.

He wedded Lucy, eldest daughter of Sir Francis Brewster, Lord Mayor of Dublin, 1674, by whom he had two sons and three daughter, ~ viz.
Francis;
Nathaniel;
Lucy;
Dorothea;
Hester.
He went to Ireland as chaplain to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Henry Sydney, Earl of Romney, in 1692.
Mr Bland was father of the Rev Francis Bland, whose great-grandson, THE VEN NATHANIEL BLAND, Archdeacon of Aghadoe, was the head of the family; and of NATHANIEL BLAND LL.D, judge of the Prerogative Court of Dublin, and vicar-general of the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe.
THE REV FRANCIS BLAND, the eldest son, succeeded his father in the vicarage of Killarney. 

He married a daughter of Mr Waterhouse, of County Cork, and was succeeded by his son,

FRANCIS CHRISTOPHER BLAND JP DL (1770-1838), of Derryquin Castle, High Sheriff of Kerry, 1806, whose eldest son,

JAMES FRANKLIN BLAND JP (1799-1863), of Derryquin Castle, high sheriff, 1835, married and had issue, his elder son,

FRANCIS CHRISTOPHER BLAND JP (1826-99), of Derryquin Castle, high sheriff, 1859, who married and was succeeded by his heir,

JAMES FRANKLIN BLAND (1850-1927), late of Derryquin Castle, who sold Derryquin Castle.

His eldest son, 

FRANCIS CHRISTOPHER CECIL BLAND (1875-1953), married Mary Green, daughter of Henry Albert Uprichard, in 1904.

He lived at Drimina House, Sneem, County Kerry.

His eldest son, 

JAMES FRANKLIN McMAHON BLAND (1905-), married Jess Buchan, daughter of Major Harry Campbell Brodie, in 1936,
was educated at Sedbergh School, Cumberland and Trinity College, Dublin; fought in the Second World War, with the Canadian Army; Captain in the Headquarters, Pacific Command. In 1976, he lived at 14 Tullybrannigan Road, Newcastle, County Down.
His eldest son was

SIR (FRANCIS) CHRISTOPHER BUCHAN BLAND (1938-).


DERRYQUIN CASTLE, Sneem, County Kerry, was a Victorian pile of rough-hewn stone by James Franklin Fuller, built for the Bland family.

The main block was of three storeys, with a four-storey octagonal tower running through its centre.


The entrance door was at one end, flanked by a two-storey, part-curved wing.

There were rectangular, pointed and camber-headed windows; battlements, and machiolations.


The castle was eventually sold by the Blands to the Warden family.

In 1906, it was owned by Colonel Charles W Warden and valued at £70. The Wardens resided there until it was burnt in 1922.

It was located in the grounds of what is now the Parknasilla Hotel, but the ruins were demolished in 1969.

In 1732, the Rev Dr Nathaniel Bland obtained his grant of the Parknasilla area, the grantors being described as 'Rt Hon Clotworthy, Lord Viscount Massareene, and Philip Doyne, with the consent of James Stopford.'

The link with these three gentlemen is Elizabeth Smyth.

Her father, the Rt Rev Edward Smyth, Lord Bishop of Down and Connor, married secondly, the Hon Mary Skeffington.

She was the daughter of Clothworthy, 3rd Viscount Massareene. Elizabeth married James Stopford in 1726.

In 1762, he was created Viscount Stopford and Earl of Courtown. His sister, also Elizabeth Stopford, was the third wife of Philip Doyne.

The Rt Rev Richard Pococke, Lord Bishop of Ossory, visited the area in 1758.  He was an avid traveller who published accounts of his visits to the Middle East, Scotland and England.

The Bishop went in search of Dr Bland's house, which was a summer residence located between the Sneem River and the Owreagh River.

He found the house, known as 'The White House', abandoned by its owner, in favour of Parknasilla, a fine Georgian residence a little further east.

Nathaniel Bland's first wife Diana, was the daughter of Nicholas Kerneys or Kemis of County Wexford. They had two sons, John and Rev James.

It was to Rev James that Nathaniel left the bulk of his estate and we shall return to him presently. John served in the army at Dettingen, Fontenoy and Clifton Moor.

Nathaniel's son Francis, by his second marriage, was a captain in the army and gave it up to become and actor in Thomas Sheridan's company in Dublin.

He fell in love with Grace Phillips, a Welsh actress, and married her in 1758.

They had several children. Grace was the daughter of the Rev Phillips of St. Thomas's Haverfordwest.

Nathaniel  died in 1760 just before the birth of Francis and Grace's child, a daughter, in 1761.

She was christened Dorothea and known as Dorothy, although she referred to herself as Dora and acquired a surfeit of names.

In 1774, Francis decided to leave Grace and his family and marry an heiress. This time he chose the well-to-do Catherine Mahony from Kerry.

Dora became an actress and was also known by her stage name, Mrs Jordan. She was seduced by her actor manager in Dublin.

Shortly afterwards she became pregnant and fled to England and fell in love with Richard Ford , a handsome lawyer, who was knighted some years later. She lived with Ford and had three children by him.

When he failed to do the decent thing and marry her, she left him.

She became mistress to William Henry, Duke of Clarence, 3rd son of George III in 1790. He became William IV upon the death of his brother George IV.

They lived together in Busy House in Teddington, near Hampton Court from 1797 until 1811, when he took a new mistress.

Their children, ten in total and all illegitimate, were known as the FitzClarences. The boys were ennobled, the eldest was created Earl of Munster.

The girls married well, viz. two earls, a viscount, the younger son of a duke and a general in the army.

The Duke pensioned Dora off. She was swindled out of money by a son-in-law.

When Nathaniel Bland died in 1760, his son, the Rev James Bland, inherited the estate. Derryquin Castle was probably built during his era.

His son, Francis Christopher Bland, married Lucinda Herbert in 1798.

His son, James Franklin Bland, was born in 1799. Under him the Derryquin estate witnessed its golden years and was self-supporting.

His sister Frances "Fanny" Diana married Thomas Harnett Fuller of Glasnacree and their son James Franklin Fuller was to become the architect of the new Parknasilla hotel in 1897.

James Franklin Bland was succeeded in turn by his son Francis Christopher. This Francis Christopher joined the Plymouth Brethren.

He neglected his estate and devoted his energy to preaching. Land agitation was rife in Ireland at this juncture and it was unfortunate that Bland decided to absent himself.

The estate inevitably went into rapid decline.

First published in September, 2012.

Monday, 15 September 2014

Rowallane House

Moore of Rowallane

THE MOORE FAMILY OWNED 510 ACRES OF LAND IN COUNTY DOWN

This family claims to be a branch of the very ancient Scottish house of MURE, or MUIR, of Rowallan, Ayrshire.

COLONEL MUIR, of WILLIAM III's army, obtained a grant of lands in Ulster.

His son, 

HUGH MOORE, captain in the 9th Dragoons, married to Elizabeth Clarke, was some time agent for the Annesley estate at Clough, County Down.

Dying in 1777, aged 81, he was buried at Kilmegan graveyard. His eldest son,

JOHN MOORE, also land agent to the Annesley estate, married Deborah, daughter of Robert Isaac, of Holywood, County Down.

He died in 1800, aged 74, leaving a son,

HUGH MOORE,
of Eglantine House, and of Mount Panther, County Down; captain, 5th Dragoon Guards, and Colonel of the Eglantine Yeomanry (which he raised) in the Irish Rebellion.
Colonel Moore married, in 1798, Priscilla Cecilia, daughter of Robert Armytage, of Kensington.

He was ADC to General Needham during the Irish rebellion, and raised and commanded the Eglantine Yeomanry.

Dying in 1848, he left issue,
JOHN ROBERT, his heir;
William, (1806-83), JP; m; see below;
Jane Deborah, died unmarried;
Priscilla Cecilia, m 3rd Earl Annesley;
Caroline Anne Elizabeth, m Rev J P Garrett;
Maria Clarissa, m W Humphrys.
His eldest son, 

THE REV JOHN ROBERT MOORE MA, of Rowallane, County Down; born in 1801; vicar of Kilmood, 1830.

He married, in 1850, Jane, daughter of R Morris, of Carmarthen, and relict of Henry Davidson, in a childless marriage.

His nephew,

HUGH ARMYTAGE-MOORE JP (1873-1954), of Rowallane, County Down, married, in 1910, Jane Christian, eldest daughter of Kenneth Mathieson, of 50 Prince's Gate, London;
2nd lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 1891; manager of the Annesley Estate, 1909-17; chairman, County Down section, Ulster Volunteer Force.
*****

Charles James Eglantine Armytage-Moore (1880-1960), son of William Armytage-Moore and Hugh Armytage-Moore's cousin,
was a founding partner of the London stockbrokers Buckmaster & Moore and owned an estate called Winterfold, a Queen Anne style residence with 219 acres near Cranleigh in Surrey, with a remarkable collection of furniture and art.

ROWALLANE HOUSE, near Saintfield, County Down, is a long, low, plain house of two storeys, with a higher block at one end.

It was built in 1861 by the Rev John Moore, who had purchased the property as a farm.  

In 1858 he had bought a townland called Creevyloughgare

After this initial acquisition, Mr Moore then acquired the neighbouring townland, Leggyowan, in the early 1870s and named it Rowallane, meaning Beautiful Cleanrig, after the ancestral home of his Scottish forebears.

He gradually enlarged the farmhouse, added the walled garden and stable block and planted The Pleasure Grounds.

The house has irregular fenestration, with a few first-floor windows having little, iron balconies.


The grounds contain various turrets; an obelisk made of spherical stones from the river bed; and other 20th century follies.

The house and grounds, comprising ca 220 acres, were walled-in and converted from farmland to the fifty acre layout as seen today.

The land has pockets of good acid soil and much rock near the surface, so planting is mitigated by these conditions.

The planting is informal, for the above reason, and it also reflects the style of the era.

Initially shelter trees were planted, and the Pleasure Grounds developed to the west of the house.


Ornamental plants were added, but the important plant collection that can be appreciated today occurred between 1903-55 by Hugh Armytage Moore ~ whose sister, incidentally, was the first wife of Percy French.

This has become one of the greatest gardens in Northern Ireland and is appreciated for the fine variety of plant material, which can be enjoyed at all times of the year.

The size is not intimidating ~ fifty acres; and the layout is varied by being in compartments, often using earlier stone-walled field boundaries.


There is the Spring Ground (above), Stream Ground, and the New Ground, to name some of the areas.


The Rock Garden (above) lies at the southern end of the garden and, as a large natural rock outcrop, provides an ideal spot to grow a wide range of alpines and unusual shrubs.


The walled garden, originally a conventional fruit, vegetable and flower garden, became a focus for the plant collection and, at the present time, is fully maintained and contains many interesting species, including the national collection of penstemons.

Rhododendrons are a speciality and they can be seen in many parts of the grounds. Wild flowers are encouraged in the Pleasure Ground.

A great deal has been written about Rowallane in horticultural journals.

Rowallane demesne was acquired by the National Trust in 1955 and, since then, the gardens have been improved and the plant collection added to.

The ground floor of Rowallane House is now open to visitors with a new café, shop, and exhibition on the ground floor.


The house has recently undergone internal alterations and visitors can now enjoy new enhanced facilities.
Alterations include: the formation of structural openings to the ground floor to provide a new café, shop and interpretation area; a new tea room, designed to bring the outdoors indoors, with the colour scheme depicting the four seasons; while customers can also enjoy a new outdoor patio area.
There is also a pottery.

First published in September, 2012.

Prince Henry of Wales


PRINCE HENRY OF WALES is 30 today.

His Royal Highness Prince Henry Charles Albert David of Wales is the younger son of the Prince of Wales and is fourth in line to the Throne.

Captain Harry Wales (as he is known in the army) is currently a staff officer with the Blues & Royals, HQ London District.

MEDALS

Sunday, 14 September 2014

Carrickfergus Visit

I have visited the historic town of Carrickfergus, County Antrim, this afternoon, as part of the European Heritage open days.

The Barony of Carrickfergus is a subsidiary title of HRH The Duke of Cambridge.

The Castle hasn't changed greatly (!) since my last visit several years ago.

It retains its fascination, though, having stood here for over eight centuries.

Dobbs mural plaque in St Nicholas's Parish Church

AFTERWARDS I ambled across the road, to the parish church of St Nicholas, an ecclesiastical building of considerable antiquity.

This church is celebrated for its association with the Chichester family, Marquesses and Earls of Donegall.


The Chichester Monument is located at the end of the Donegall aisle.


Many members of the family are interred here.


There is also a mural monument to Thomas Legg, Mayor of Carrickfergus in the late 18th century.